Monday, June 9, 2008

A Chinese Treat - Gau Gee

gau gee In Hawaii you can get tasty little Asian treats just about anywhere. They are our local fast foods. One local favorite is Chinese gau gee.

My friend Easter was kind enough to share her recipe (which her dear husband actually prepared for their family).

CRISPY GAU GEE
found at Cooks.com

1/2 lb. ground pork
6 med. sized shrimps, cleaned, deveined, and chopped
1/4 c. chopped green onion
1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. sugar
1/8 tsp. pepper
1 tbsp. oyster sauce
1/2 tsp. sesame seed oil
1/2 tsp. shoyu
8 minced water chestnuts
1 pkg. wonton wrappers
Oil for frying

Combine all ingredients; mix thoroughly. Place 1 teaspoon of filling in the center of wonton wrapper. Fold in half, forming a rectangle. Seal edges with water. Deep fry in hot oil (375 degrees) until golden brown. Drain on paper towel.

19 comments:

scmom (Barbara) said...

Esther -- can you tell me what shoyu is?

Esther said...

Barb, Shoyu is soy sauce.

mm said...

I've never heard of these before but
those look like Totino's pizza rolls,

Esther said...

But they are so much more tastier!!

Fritz said...

These look really good. I was wondering, though, about a few things. What's the texture like on these? Sometimes the ones I've had at restaurants are kind of mealy, like a ground meat meatball, and other times (like at Raymond's old place in Kalihi) they're nice and tender with a great "snap" when you bite 'em. Also, how long would I boil or simmer or steam them if I want to put them in soup? Finally, how would I adjust the cooking time/temp if I wanted to make them big, like the restaurant ones? Sorry so many questions, but I LOVE gau gee and can't get it in L.A.

Esther said...

Fritz, this would should be tender and moist and crispy on the outside if fried in very hot oil.

If you boil them, they are ready when they float to the top.

Steaming depends on how much filling you use as the wrapper itself cooks very quickly.

Anonymous said...

If you wanted them larger, use egg roll wrappers. They had these in a little Chinese restaurant off of Bishop & one block west, down an unmarked alley. Their gaugee were FABULOUS! Of course, I have to have sweet & sour sauce to dip them in. You could serve them over stir fried vegetables with the sauce. They did that in the Chinese restaurant at the military hotel in Seoul, Korea. I LOVE them!

dha682 said...

You can find this at a number of chinese restaurants in Hawaii but, try Kin Wah restaurant in Kaneohe, Oahu. Ono brah!!

Esther said...

Mahalo!

Anonymous said...

What are the Proteins, Fats, and Calories in this recipe? this is for a project, and i need to make this so i decided to use this recipe because it seems simple enough! i'm a student at kalani high school. thanks for the help!

Esther G. said...

I'm sorry but I got this recipe from a friend and she did not provide that information. I did find HECO's info for pot stickers which may give you some idea of the fat and protein content (keep in mind the recipe I have on my blog is deep-fried).
http://www.heco.com/portal/site/heco/menuitem.33c4127d7938fd26dce8d210c510b1ca/?vgnextoid=b042ef4f4f1ae110VgnVCM1000005c011bacRCRD

Anonymous said...

Is that really the wonton wrappers?

Esther G. said...

To make gau gee? Yes.

Towermaster said...

OMG,I used to eat these like they were candy when I was a kid. Every Saturday afternoon at the local Saimin shop in Kailua.Now on the east coast on the mainland cant get that here. I am glad now I have a recipe. Thank You Easter.. Mahalo!!!

Esther G. said...

:-)

Anonymous said...

How many servings would this dish make?

Esther G. said...

It would be more like an appetizer. A few for maybe 4 or 5 people???

Anonymous said...

I cooked these at 375, the wrap was baked nicely but the pork still pink. Should I finish them in the oven?

Esther Gefroh said...

Are you putting too much filling in each? I would microwave them a minute and then deep fry them if you are concerned about uncooked meat.